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Pet Matters… aka Pets Matter





 

Tuesday
May212019

Smithtown Shelter Pet Of The Week - KIX

KIX 16 YR OLD MALE DOMESTIC SHORTHAIR

SMITHTOWN, NY:  Introducing Kix; an older fella with an unlimited supply of love to give one lucky family. Kix is a 16 year old male/neutered cat who was found injured, limping along the road. Thanks to medical attention and a tremendous amount of TLC, Kix has made a wonderful recovery living at the Animal Shelter. He is extremely friendly and will often reach out his little white paw for attention whenever a human walks into his room. Everyone who meets him falls in love with him!

Kix is neutered, current on vaccinations; Dewormed; Monthly Flea & Tick Prevention Applied, Microchipped and FeLV/FIV negative. He’s house-trained, good with other cats, dogs and kids. Kix is looking for a Furrever Home, where he can be cared for and loved for the remainder of his nine lives.

All of the felines at the Shelter are current on vaccines and have received a full workup (blood work, Feline HIV & Leukemia tested, physical exam etc) by a board certified Veterinarian.

FOSTER HOMES WANTED:

The Smithtown Animal Shelter is currently seeking Foster Homes for kitten season. Minimum commitment is one month, potentially longer. Fostering Kittens involves daily feedings, cleanings and socializing. All kittens are flea treated and dewormed prior to going to a foster home. If you think you are interested in fostering kittens, please fill out our online application. Primary caregiver must be 18 years old (three references) If approved, training will & supplies will be PROVIDED.

Thinking About Adoption:

The Smithtown Animal Shelter’s primary concern is finding the perfect home for each animal that finds his/her way to us. The Animal Control Officers and Kennel Attendants at the Smithtown Animal Shelter will go out of their way to ensure both the rescued and rescuer are made for one another.

Residents who have other pets, can arrange to bring your four-legged family member to the shelter or set up an at home meet & greet to see how your prospective family member does with other family, pets and the household itself. Please allow yourself an hour minimum to meet with your potential new family member.

Hours at Smithtown Animal Shelter are currently Monday - Friday 8AM - 4:30PM and Saturday 8AM - 3:30PM. (Sunday’s: by appointment only). To Inquire about the pet of the week or to meet your potential soulmate, please call the Smithtown Animal Shelter at 631-360-7575.

Monday
May202019

DEC Urges New Yorkers: If You Care, Leave It There

 

Residents Cautioned Against Disturbing Fawns and Other Young Wildlife

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is reminding New Yorkers to enjoy wildlife and their young from a safe distance and resist the urge to touch or pick up newborn fawns and other young wildlife. Human contact with wildlife can carry unintended consequences detrimental to wildlife safety and development.

DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos said, “New York’s amazing natural wonders come alive during the spring and summer seasons, offering exciting encounters with wildlife in fields, forests, and even your own backyard. If you see a fawn, baby rabbit, or a just-fledged bird, I encourage you to enjoy the encounter from a distance and not attempt to approach or touch the animal. Remember, if you care, leave it there.”

At this time of year, animal sightings and encounters are not unusual. Young wildlife quickly venture into the world on wobbly legs or are unable to fly on their own. While most young wildlife learn survival skills from one or both adults, some receive little or no care. Often, wild animals stay away from their young, especially when people are present. For all these young animals, the perils of survival are a natural part of life in the wild. Unfortunately, well-intentioned individuals may attempt to care for young wild animals they believe to be abandoned or in need of assistance. However, human interaction typically does more damage than good.


Photo Credit - Gert Federici

White-tailed deer fawns are a good example of how human interaction with young wildlife can be problematic. Most fawns are born during late May and early June. Although fawns can walk shortly after birth, they spend most of their first several days lying still in tall grass, leaf litter, or sometimes relatively unconcealed. During this period, a fawn is usually left alone by the adult female (doe), except when nursing. People occasionally find a lone fawn and mistakenly assume it has been abandoned, which is rare. Fawns should never be picked up. If human presence is detected by the doe, the doe may delay its next visit to nurse.

A fawn’s best chance to survive is to be raised by the adult doe. Fawns nurse three to four times a day, usually for less than 30 minutes at a time, but otherwise the doe keeps her distance. This helps reduce the chance that a predator will follow her to the fawn. A fawn’s protective coloration and ability to remain motionless help it avoid detection by predators and people.

By the end of its second week, a fawn begins to move about and spend more time with the doe. It also begins to eat grass and leaves. At about 10 weeks of age, fawns are no longer dependent on milk, although they continue to nurse occasionally into the fall. During August, deer begin to grow their winter coats and fawns lose their spots.

In addition, young wildlife are not pets. Keeping wildlife in captivity is both illegal and harmful to the animal. Wild animals are not well-suited for life in captivity and may carry diseases that can be transferred to humans. Resist the temptation to take them out of the wild. Those who observe sick-acting wildlife or wildlife acting abnormally should keep people and pets away and contact their DEC regional wildlife office. For more information and answers to frequently asked questions about young wildlife, visit DEC’s website.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/press/press.html

Sunday
May192019

Mineola Husband and Wife Arrested for Animal Cruelty

Mineola Husband and Wife Arrested for Animal Cruelty

Capture

MINEOLA, N.Y. – Nassau County District Attorney Madeline Singas and the Nassau County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals announced that a Mineola man was arraigned on grand jury indictment charges for allegedly killing two puppies just days after obtaining them and nearly killing a third animal. His wife has also been charged for permitting the unjustifiable suffering of the third puppy. 

Ellie Knoller, 29, was arraigned before Judge Meryl Berkowitz and charged with three counts of Aggravated Cruelty to Animals (an E felony) and three counts of Overdriving, Torturing and Injuring Animals (an A misdemeanor). The defendant was released on his own recognizance, surrendered his passport and is due back in court June 3. If convicted of the top count, the defendant faces a maximum of two years in prison.

Jessica Kuncman, also known as Jessica Knoller, 30, was arraigned before Judge Meryl Berkowitz and charged with Overdriving, Torturing and Injuring Animals (an A misdemeanor). The defendant was released on her own recognizance, surrendered her passport and is due back in court June 3. If convicted of the top count, the defendant faces a maximum of one year in prison.

“Three healthy puppies suffered horrific injuries while they were under the care and control of these defendants,” DA Singas said. “Sadly, these animals can’t testify about the unconscionable suffering that they endured, but their blunt force and neck trauma injuries tell a gruesome story, and we are committed to seeking justice on their behalf. This is an ongoing investigation and we encourage anyone who may information about these dogs or their injuries to contact our Animal Crimes Unit at 516-571-7755.”

“Practically beaten to death, it’s difficult to imagine someone could harm such a sweet little dog, but that is what happened to Bella, beaten and choked, leaving her with several broken ribs, her forearm broken in two places and a pulmonary contusion. It’s a miracle this little girl is alive and recovering, two other dogs were not so lucky. After 35 years of animal crimes investigations, I have never seen a case like this. To injure the internal organs of a dog takes a large amount of blunt force and great trauma, one could only imagine the suffering these dogs endured. It is said that a society is judged by the way we treat animals, thankfully in Nassau County, the Nassau County District Attorney and Nassau County SPCA make sure they are treated properly. Animal crimes are not tolerated,” said Gary Rogers, President of the Nassau Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

DA Singas that on February 8 the defendants allegedly adopted a 10-12-week-old male Shepherd mix named Tucker from a local pet adoption agency, and by February 17, the puppy was dead of a kidney rupture. It is alleged that Ellie Knoller inflicted blunt force trauma to the dog that resulted in the kidney rupture, causing the dog to suffer from extensive internal bleeding and die.

Additionally, on or about February 18, the defendants allegedly purchased a 10-12-week-old male brown Goldendoodle puppy named Cooper, from a breeder in Pennsylvania. On February 20, Defendant Ellie Knoller allegedly brought the puppy into Garden City Veterinary Care in cardiac and respiratory arrest.

By the time a veterinarian examined Cooper he had already died. The dog’s cause of death was determined to be from a lacerated liver. It is alleged that Ellie Knoller inflicted blunt force trauma on the dog that resulted in the lacerated liver, causing extensive and ultimately fatal internal bleeding.

The above-listed incidents came to light following an investigation into the defendants after they allegedly brought a lethargic and lifeless 11-week-old female brown Goldendoodle puppy named Bella to Veterinary Referral & Emergency Center of Westbury on February 27.

Upon examination, the veterinarians found Bella to have multiple fractured ribs, bruising on her lungs, bleeding behind her eyes and a broken leg. Bella required surgery, including the insertion of a metal rod, to repair her leg and has a steel plate to hold the bones in place while they heal. It is alleged that Ellie Knoller inflicted blunt force trauma on the dog that resulted in her injuries. She continues to recover from her other injuries and has since been seized pursuant to a search warrant and is now in the care of the Nassau County SPCA.

The defendants allegedly received Bella after complaining to the breeder that Cooper had unexpectedly died, and she is from the same litter as Cooper.

 The indictment alleges defendant Jessica Kuncman did not take Bella for veterinary care for approximately 15 hours after the puppy appeared to be in pain, causing unjustifiable suffering.

Assistant District Attorney Stephanie Hernan of DA Singas’ Animal Crimes Unit is prosecuting this case. Defendant Ellie Knoller is represented by Greg Madey, Esq. and Defendant Jessica Knoller is represented by Jeff Groder, Esq.

The charges are merely accusations and the defendants are presumed innocent until and unless found guilty.

Due to the cost of Bella’s medical care, the NCSPCA is seeking assistance from the public. Please visit http://luckytobealive.ncspca.us .

Additional photos can be found here: https://ny-nassaucountyda.civicplus.com/293/Photos-from-51519-Press-Conference

Monday
May132019

Boy Scouts Assist Legislator Trotta Collect 800 Pounds Of Pet Food

Suffolk County Legislator Rob Trotta Thanks the Community and Boy Scout Troop 5 for Donating More than 800 Pounds of Pet Food and Supplies

Suffolk County Legislator Rob Trotta held his annual Pet Food Drive to benefit the pet pantry at Long Island Cares. Donations from residents and the efforts of Boy Scout Troop 5 of East Northport/Commack brought in over 800 pounds of pet food and supplies.

“I think it is great that the scouts of Troop 5 have volunteered to help with this event and I thank Petco in Commack for letting them set up a table to collect donations and to assist them with this project. I also appreciate that many residents contributed so many items as well as cans and bags of pet food,” said Suffolk County Legislator Rob Trotta.

Pictured at Petco in Commack are from left Scout Leaders Jon Washko and Robert LaReddola and Suffolk County Legislator Rob Trotta with some of the scouts from Troop 5.

 

 

Friday
May102019

SCPD Officers Rescue A Family Of Ducklings

Suffolk County Police officers along with Babylon Highway Department employees rescued a family of ducklings that had fallen into a storm drain in Lindenhurst today.

First Precinct officers responded to South 15th Street and West Hoffman Avenue at approximately 7:15 a.m. after a 911 caller reported ducklings had fallen into a storm drain while the mother duck stood at the top of the drain. The officers notified the Emergency Service Section and Babylon Highway Department.

Babylon Highway Department employees removed the grate from the top of the drain and Emergency Service Section Officer James Brucculeri climbed into the drain and rescued the six ducklings.

The ducklings were reunited with their mother once removed from the drain.

Tuesday
May072019

Smithtown Shelter Pet Of The Week - Memphis

The Smithtown Animal Shelter Pet of the Week, is Memphis a 3 ½ year old Male Boxer Terrier Mix. Memphis was recently surrendered to the shelter because his owner couldn’t devote enough time for him due to a heavy work schedule. It’s obvious that Memphis was well loved, as he’s an absolute mush. This handsome boy thrives on affection, attention and playing with all types of toys. Memphis is well trained, knows simple commands and is good with kids and other dogs.

Memphis is neutered, on preventatives and all up-to-date on his vaccinations. His perfect home would be with a big backyard, no cats and a family with children ages 12 and over to love him unconditionally.

If you are interested in meeting Memphis please call ahead to schedule an hour to properly interact with him in a domestic setting, which includes our Meet and Greet Room, the dog runs and our Dog Walk trail. Family Pet Meet and Greets are also welcome and an integral part of the adoption process.

Thinking About Adoption:

The Smithtown Animal Shelter’s primary concern is finding the perfect home for each animal that finds his/her way to us. The Animal Control Officers at the Smithtown Animal Shelter will go out of their way to ensure both the rescued and rescuer are made for one another. If you have other pets, you can arrange to bring your four-legged family member into the shelter or we can set up an at home meet & greet to see how your prospective family member does with other family members, pets or the household itself.

Hours at Smithtown Animal Shelter are currently Monday - Friday 8AM - 4:30 PM and Saturday 8AM - 3:30PM. (Sunday’s: by appointment only). To Inquire about the pet of the week or to meet your potential soulmate, please call the Smithtown Animal & Adoption Center at 631-360-7575.

 

Tuesday
Apr232019

Pet Of The Week -Stripes

SMITHTOWN, NY: Stripes is a handsome 2 year old male who was rescued due to a hoarding situation. He can be a little cautious at first, but quickly warms up to all he meets. Stripes is neutered, current on vaccinations; Dewormed; Monthly Flea & Tick Prevention Applied, Microchipped and FeLV/FIV negative.

Stripes currently lives in a Kitty Condo with his roommate, Daphne. He’s very sweet & affectionate, good with other cats and kids. He’s looking for a loving family to love and snuggle up to for cat naps and movie nights for the rest of his nine lives.  

All of the felines at the Shelter are current on vaccines and have received a full workup (blood work, Feline HIV & Leukemia tested, physical exam etc) by a board certified Veterinarian.

FOSTER HOMES WANTED:

The Smithtown Animal Shelter is currently seeking Foster Homes as we kick off kitten season. Minimum commitment is one month, potentially longer. Fostering Kittens involves daily feedings, cleanings and socializing. All kittens are flea treated and dewormed prior to going to a foster home. If you think you are interested in fostering kittens, please fill out our online application. Primary caregiver must be 18 years old (three references) If approved, training will & supplies will be PROVIDED FREE OF CHARGE.

 Thinking About Adoption:

The Smithtown Animal Shelter’s primary concern is finding the perfect home for each animal that finds his/her way to us. The Animal Control Officers and Kennel Attendants at the Smithtown Animal Shelter will go out of their way to ensure both the rescued and rescuer are made for one another.

Residents who have other pets, can arrange to bring your four-legged family member to the shelter or set up an at home meet & greet to see how your prospective family member does with other family, pets and the household itself. Please allow yourself an hour minimum to meet with your potential new family member.

While we are a 24/7 Shelter, Public Walk-in hours at the Smithtown Animal Shelter are currently Monday - Friday 8AM - 4:30PM and Saturday 8AM - 3:30PM. (Sunday’s: by appointment only). To Inquire about the pet of the week or to meet your potential soulmate, please call the Smithtown Animal Shelter at 631-360-7575.

 

Saturday
Apr202019

Great Hollow Students Learn How Dogs Impact Life Of Humans

Guide dogs get acquainted with Great Hollow students

Sixth graders at Great Hollow Middle School in the Smithtown Central School District has a special visit from representatives from America’s VetDogs, a sister organization of the Guide Dog Foundation, along with two canine friends on April 18. Tying into their English language arts curriculum, sixth graders at Great Hollow Middle School in the Smithtown Central School District had a special visit from two furry friends on April 18. The students spent the last month learning about how dogs impact the life of humans, reading and writing reaction pieces about the effect of canines on people. 

Representatives from America’s VetDogs, a sister organization of the Guide Dog Foundation, located in Smithtown, visited with students to teach them about the role of the canines, how they are trained and how they help those in need.

America’s VetDogs is a nonprofit organization that provides disabled veterans and first responders with service dogs to offer independence, enhanced mobility and companionship. VetDogs assist veterans or first responders with physical disabilities and those with hearing or vision loss. The Guide Dog Foundation provides services for those with vision and/or hearing loss. The Great Hollow students collected toys and food to donate to the organization, which they presented following the assembly. 

Photo courtesy of Smithtown Central School District